Category Archives: News

ISCLH Summer 2020 Book Talk Series: “The Board of Rites and the Making of Modern China”

ISCLH Summer Book Talks continue! Speakers Macabe Keliher and Taisu Zhang will discuss The Board of Rites and the Making of Modern China on Thursday 7/2 9-10:30 EST. If you have already registered for previous talks, you can use same login. Otherwise, please see flyer for more info on registration!

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ISCLH Summer 2020 Book Talk Series: “Circulating the Code”

ISCLH Summer Book Talks continue! Speakers Ting Zhang  and Li Chen discuss Circulating the Code on Fri 6/12 9-10:30 EST. If you have already registered for previous talk, you can use same login. Otherwise see flyer for more info on registration!

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ISCLH Summer 2020 Book Talks

ISCLH is pleased to announce a series of book talks during the summer of 2020! Please see poster for schedule of speakers and discussants and instructions to participate via Zoom. The first speakers Philip Thai (Northeastern) and Peter Thilly (Mississippi) will discuss China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Economic Life, and the Making of the Modern State, 1842–1965 on Thursday, May 21 9:00-10:30 EST to accommodate audiences in the Americas and Asia.

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New Publication: Pierre-Étienne Will, Handbooks and Anthologies for Officials in Imperial China

Handbooks and Anthologies for Officials in Imperial China

Pierre-Étienne Will, Collège de France

Brill, 2020

Publisher’s Link:

https://brill.com/view/title/38448

Publisher’s Description

The 1,165 entries of Handbooks and Anthologies for Officials in Imperial China by Pierre-Étienne Will and collaborators provide a descriptive list of extant manuscript and printed works—mainly from the Song, Ming, and Qing dynasties—created with the aim to instruct officials and other administrators of imperial China about the technical and ethical aspects of government, and to provide tools and guides to help with the relevant procedures. Both generalist and specialized texts are considered. Among the latter, such disciplines as the administration of justice, famine relief, and the military receive particular attention. Each entry includes the publishing history of the work considered (including modern editions), an analysis of contents, and a biographical sketch of the author.

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New Publication: Ting Zhang, Circulating the Code: Print Media and Legal Knowledge in Qing China

Circulating the Code: Print Media and Legal Knowledge in Qing China

Ting Zhang, University of Maryland

University of Washington Press, 2020

Publisher’s Link:

https://uwapress.uw.edu/book/9780295747156/circulating-the-code/

Publisher’s Description

Contrary to longtime assumptions about the insular nature of imperial China’s legal system, Circulating the Code demonstrates that in the Qing dynasty (1644–1911) most legal books were commercially published and available to anyone who could afford to buy them. Publishers not only extended circulation of the dynastic code and other legal texts but also enhanced the judicial authority of case precedents and unofficial legal commentaries by making them more broadly available in convenient formats. As a result, the laws no longer represented privileged knowledge monopolized by the imperial state and elites. Trade in commercial legal imprints contributed to the formation of a new legal culture that included the free flow of accurate information, the rise of nonofficial legal experts, a large law-savvy population, and a high litigation rate.

Comparing different official and commercial editions of the Qing Code, popular handbooks for amateur legal practitioners, and manuals for community legal lectures, Ting Zhang demonstrates how the dissemination of legal information transformed Chinese law, judicial authority, and popular legal consciousness.

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New Personnel and Elected Officers

Dear Members of ISCLH:

We are pleased to announce the results of the fourth biennial general election held last December. Now, after the Board of Directors approved the nomination by the Executive Committee, we are pleased to announce the new personnel—together with the newly elected officers.

本屆學會管理層如下:

ISCLH Executive Officers 學會日常管理人員 (括號中爲所在大學及地區):

President 會長: Dr. CHIU Pengsheng 邱澎生 (Jiaotong, PRC)

Vice-President 副會長: Dr. CHEN Shuang 陳爽 (Iowa, US)

Secretaries 秘書長: Dr. GUO Weiting 郭威廷 (Aix-Marseille, France), Dr. ZHAO Jing 趙晶 (Zhengfa 中國政法大學, PRC)

Treasurer 財務長: Dr. CHEN Dandan 陳丹丹 (SUNY Farmingdale, US)

The Committee on Research 文獻委員會: Dr. ZHANG Ting 張婷 (Chair, Maryland, US), Dr. Roy STURGEON 罗义 (Tulane, US), Dr. ZHANG Yongle 章永樂 (Peking 北京大學, PRC), Dr. YANG Songtao 楊松濤 (Henan 河南大學, PRC)

The Committee of Conference 會議委員會: Dr. WANG Fei-Hsien 王飛仙 (Chair, Indiana, US), Dr. DU Yue 杜樂 (Cornell, US), Dr. CAI Liang 蔡亮 (Notre Dame, US), Dr. XIA Yun 夏昀 (Shanghai 上海大學, PRC), Dr. Tristan BROWN 張仲思 (MIT, US)

The Committee on Publication 出版委員會: Dr. CONG Xiaoping 叢小平 (Chair, UT Houston, US), Dr. LAI Junnan 賴駿楠 (Jiaotong, PRC), Dr. NIE Xin 聶鑫 (Tsinghua 清華大學, PRC), Dr. LIU Sida 劉思達 (Toronto, CA), Daniel ASEN 安大年 (Rutgers, US)

The Committee on Development 發展委員會: Dr. Philip THAI 蔡駿治 (Chair, Northeastern, US), Dr. LUO Weiwei 羅娓娓 (Grinnell, US), Dr. Jennifer ALTEHENGER 李悦歆 (Oxford, UK), Dr. Jedidiah KRONCKE 鄺傑 (HKU, HK), Jackson GUO 郭躍斌 (Toronto, CA)

The joint governing body of the Society consists of the Board of Directors and the Executive Council 學會最高管理機構由董事會和執委會聯合組成.

The Board of Directors 董事會 (in alphabetical order):

Jérôme BOURGON 鞏濤 (CNRS, France)
Thomas BUOYE 步德茂 (Tulsa, US)
CHAN Chun-Keung 陳俊強 (National Taipei 國立臺北大學, ROC)
CHEN Hwei-syin 陳惠馨 (Chengchi 政治大學, ROC) (honorary)

CHEN Li 陳利 (Toronto, CA)
LIANG Zhiping 梁治平 (Chinese National Academy of Arts 中国艺术研究院, PRC) (honorary)

Kentaro MATSUBARA 松原健太郎 (Tokyo, Japan)
Nancy PARK 朴蘭詩 (CSU East Bay, US) (honorary)
Billy SO 蘇基朗 (Macau, Macau)

Matthew SOMMER 蘇成捷 (Stanford, US)
WANG Zhiqiang 王志強 (Fudan 復旦大學, PRC)
Robin YATES 葉山 (McGill, CA) (honorary)

Madeleine ZELIN 曾小萍 (Columbia, US)
ZHANG Taisu 張泰蘇 (Yale, US) (Immediate Past President 前會長)

Plus the following members of the Executive Council 董事會成員還包含下列執委會成員:

The Executive Council 執行委員會:
Dr. CHIU Pengsheng (President), Dr. ZHANG Taisu (Immediate Past President), Dr. CHEN Shuang (Vice-President), Dr. ZHANG Ting (Committee Chair), Dr. WANG Fei-Hsien (Committee Chair), Dr. CONG Xiaoping (Committee Chair), Dr. Philip THAI (Committee Chair), Dr. GUO Weiting (Secretary), Dr. ZHAO Jing (Secretary), Dr. CHEN Dandan (Treasurer)

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New Publication: Frédéric Constant, “Le droit mongol dans l’État sino-mandchou (1644-1911): Entre autonomie et assimilation”

Le droit mongol dans l’État sino-mandchou (1644-1911): Entre autonomie et assimilation
(“Mongolian law in the Sino-Manchu state (1644-1911): Between autonomy and assimilation”)

Frédéric Constant, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, France

Collège de France, Bibliothèque de l’Institut des Hautes Études Chinoises, 2019

Retailer’s Link

http://www.deboccard.com/fr/category/15877-Produit-9782857570790.html

Publisher’s Description

Partant d’une description complète de la législation impériale promulguée par le gouvernement des Qing pour la Mongolie, l’auteur examine dans ce livre les problèmes nés de l’introduction de cette législation aux Mongols et de l’application de celle-ci. L’étude d’un large éventail de documents juridiques — incluant les codes mongols antérieurs aux Qing, la législation impériale, les règlements administratifs et les jugements rendus à la fois aux niveaux local et central — lui permet d’analyser les interactions entre le droit et diverses questions relatives à l’autonomie locale, au pluralisme juridique, à l’assimilation politique et aux relations entre le centre et la périphérie.

L’auteur défend l’idée que les Qing tendirent à mettre en valeur l’approche et les principes du droit chinois lors de l’élaboration de la législation propre aux Mongols. Ils transférèrent progressivement une grande partie de concepts étrangers à la tradition juridique mongole, sinon leur totalité. Malgré les efforts importants mis en œuvre pour contrôler et normaliser l’administration des régions périphériques jusqu’à en faire une extension de la Chine intérieure plutôt qu’un protectorat gouverné par l’aristocratie locale, et malgré les effets de l’immigration Han en Mongolie, les principes du droit mongol ne disparurent cependant pas complètement, ainsi qu’en témoignent les jugements rendus par les juges des niveaux inférieurs de l’administration Qing en Mongolie.

This book provides a comprehensive description of legislation enacted by the Qing government for the Mongols and subsequent problems of enforcement. Relying on a wealth of legal sources—including pre-conquest Mongol codes, Qing legislation, and administrative regulations and judgments rendered both at the central and local administration levels—Le droit mongol examines the interplay between the legal realm and crucial questions such as local autonomy, legal pluralism, political assimilation and center-periphery relation. The author argues that in crafting and enforcing legislation that was specific to the Mongols, the Qing emphasized the traditional legal approaches inherited from the Ming and earlier dynasties, leading to the gradual displacement of much of the indigenous Mongol legal concepts and procedures. Despite forceful efforts by the Manchu state to control and normalize the administration of the Mongol region, such that it became an extension of China proper rather than a protectorate entrusted to the local Mongol aristocracy, and despite the impact of Han Chinese immigration; nonetheless, Mongolian laws, principles, and judicial practices did not disappear altogether. The result was a multi-layered and hybrid legal system that integrated indigenous Mongol, traditional Chinese, and Qing dynastic legal traditions and practices.

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ISCLH Workshop, “Law and Empire in the Sino-Asian Context”

ISCLH is pleased to announce the schedule for the workshop, “Law and Empire in the Sino-Asian Context” to be held on November 21, 2019 at Harvard Law School. Co-hosted with the American Society for Legal History (ASLH) and the Harvard Law School Program in East Asian Legal Studies, the workshop will take place right before the ASLH annual conference and is open to the public. Please see below for details on speakers and panels.

For more information on the 2019 ASLH annual conference, please click here.

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New Publication: Maria Adele Carrai, “Sovereignty in China: A Genealogy of a Concept since 1840”

Sovereignty in China: A Genealogy of a Concept since 1840

Maria Adele Carrai, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

Cambridge University Press, 2019

Publisher’s Link

https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/law/public-international-law/sovereignty-china-genealogy-concept-1840

Publisher’s Description

This book provides a comprehensive history of the emergence and the formation of the concept of sovereignty in China from the year 1840 to the present. It contributes to broadening the history of modern China by looking at the way the notion of sovereignty was gradually articulated by key Chinese intellectuals, diplomats and political figures in the unfolding of the history of international law in China, rehabilitates Chinese agency, and shows how China challenged Western Eurocentric assumptions about the progress of international law. It puts the history of international law in a global perspective, interrogating the widely-held belief of international law as universal order and exploring the ways in which its history is closely anchored to a European experience that fails to take into account how the encounter with other non-European realities has influenced its formation.

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. International law and the sinocentric ritual system: a nineteenth-century clash of normative orders
2. Secularizing a sacred empire: early translations and uses of international law
3. China’s struggle for survival and the new Darwinist conception of international society (1895–1911)
4. China rejoining the world and its fictional sovereignty, 1912–1949
5. From Proletarian revolution to peaceful coexistence: sovereignty in the PRC, 1949–1989
Conclusion

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CFP: ASLH Pre-Conference Workshop on Law and Empire in Sino-Asian History

The American Society for Legal History (ASLH), the International Society for Chinese Law and History (ISCLH), and the Harvard Law School East Asian Legal Studies Program (EALS) jointly invite submissions for a pre-conference workshop in Cambridge, MA on November 21, 2019, directly preceding ASLH’s 2019 annual meeting in Boston. The theme of the workshop is “Law and Empire in Sino-Asian History”: it aims to explore the legal and institutional dimensions of empire in early modern and modern Asia, insofar as they are substantially related to China. Proposals should therefore seriously engage with some aspect of Chinese history, but need not so do exclusively—comparative or transnational papers are most welcome.

We hope, in particular, to present the work of a number of scholars who are new to the ASLH annual meeting–early career scholars and graduate students are therefore especially encouraged to apply. In this way, we hope to promote scholarship in this area of legal history and to encourage more Asianists and Sinologists to attend the ASLH meeting.

The event will be composed of three panels of three to four papers each. One panel, keeping with the traditions of ASLH pre-conference workshops, will exclusively feature early career scholars and graduate students, and we will match each paper on this panel with its own commentator. The other two panels are open to scholars of all ranks and seniority, and follow the usual ASLH panel format: three to four presenters, followed by one commentator, and then by open discussion with the audience.

Applications to the workshop should include a current curriculum vitae, a title, and a paper abstract of no more than 400 words. Applicants whose proposals are accepted will receive some support towards conference hotel and travel costs. Please note that submission to the workshop does NOT preclude a separate submission to the main ASLH meeting (see https://aslh.net/conference/2019-annual-meeting/).

Applications close on April 5, 2019, at 5 pm EST. Please send queries and applications to Michael Ng (ngmichaelhk@gmail.com) and Shuang Chen (shuang-chen@uiowa.edu), with the subject line “ASLH 2019 Pre-Conference Workshop.” Decisions will be sent out by mid-June.

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